Kayak fishing crate GoPro mounting rig

View from my GoPro Hero2 utilizing a side mounting location on the base frame.

It seems the quest never ends for finding that perfect mounting location for the GoPro camera (or any other action cam, for that matter).  I’m constantly researching mounts and angles, which usually means watching awesome videos on Youtube and Vimeo.  It’s no secret that most of these videos are of kayak fishing.

One item that nearly all kayak fishermen utilize is a milk crate, usually located in the stern of the kayak, to organize tackle, gear, and necessities when on the water.  I’ve used a tube mounted within the crate along with a hacked monopod to hold my GoPro Hero2, but I decided to try to design and build something more purpose-driven for handling my camera-holding duties.

From Version 1 of my crate mount, this is utilizing the extension arm as a pole mount for shots. GoPro Hero2 baby!

The first version, visible in the picture at right, utilized 1″ PVC and was situated on top of the crate.  It was fastened to the crate via some short bungee ball tie downs.  The connection between the extension pole and the base mounted to the crate was via slip-on connections.  While this connection is strong and sturdy for this application without gluing the joints, it creates problems when attempting to remove and replace the pole, especially when on the water.  The force required to do so was wreaking havoc with the base mount frame and its position on the crate.

Version 2 of this rig changed a few things.  First, I’m using 3/4″ PVC instead of 1″.  The main reason for this decision was that 3/4″ PVC is plenty strong enough and is more comfortable in my hands than 1″ PVC when using the extension arm as a pole for filming.  Second, I built the frame to go around the top edge of the crate rather than sitting on top of it.  The frame is then bolted in place with 3/4″ PVC conduit clamps purchased at Menard’s.  Lastly, rather than using slip-on connections at the tees in the frame for mounting the extension pole, I chose to use a threaded connection to allow simple screw-on and screw-off mounting, eliminating the need to apply force to the frame.  This requires tees to be a combination of slip-on and threaded as well as a male thread adapter for the extension arm.

Base frame mounted to crate with extension arm attached.

None of the joints are glued.  The mounting brackets should hold the frame in place and keep it from disassembling itself.  Additionally, since the tees are not glued into place, you can rotate them to adjust the angle of the extension arm, providing additional flexibility in camera positioning.  This rotation is made easy by utilizing the extension arm once screwed securely into the tee.

On the business end of the extension arm, you have multiple options.  I chose to one of the stick-on flat adhesive mounts that uses the GoPro quick-release adapter.  This decision was based upon the fact that I also have a Scotty Portable Camera Mount that I use for forward filming duty and it, too, uses this quick-release mount.  You could also drill and tap a PVC cap and insert a 1/4″-20 bolt to hold any standard camera with a tripod mount or the GoPro tripod adapter.

Fabrication of the rig

My crate is a standard square crate formerly used by a certain local dairy.  Your dimensions may vary, but the concept is the same and slight modifications may be needed for your application.

Parts needed

  • 3/4″ PVC pipe (QTY: 10′)
  • 90 degree elbows (3/4″, QTY: 4)
  • Tees (3/4″, QTY: 4, Female threaded output)
  • Male PVC Adapter (3/4″, QTY: 1)
  • PVC Cap (3/4″, QTY: 1)
  • Conduit Support Snap Strap (3/4″, QTY: 8)
  • #8-32 machine screws w/ nuts (1 1/2″ or 1 3/4″, QTY: 8)

Build

Cut 8 pieces of pipe 6″ in length.  Piece the frame together with a 6″ pipe between each elbow and tee.  Squeeze connections tightly to seat the pipes as deep as possible.  Place a snap strap around each pipe section.  Test fit and make note of approximate location of the mounting holes of the straps.  Using a 9/64″ or similar drill bit to drill 8 holes in the crate for each of the snap straps.  Mount the frame using the machine screws and nuts.

For the extension arm, take your pick on length.  I am using a 3′ length.  Once cut to length, place the male adapter on one end and the cap (already prepped to your specs for your camera) on the other.  Press firmly into place, glue if you wish to.

More examples of shots from this rig are available in my flickr feed to the right.