DIY monopod hacked for kayak mounting

One of the first DIY projects I completed once obtaining my GoPro Hero2 was this monopod hack.  It takes a standard, inexpensive monopod and morphs it into an extendable GoPro boom pole.  It works great!

Recently I’ve been working on my rigging to get the boat ready for some warmer weather and the 2013 season.  On this list of things to do was another way to mount my GoPro to the kayak that doesn’t require the sometimes unstable mount of using the milk crate.  I’m really intrigued by the YakAttack GearTrac and MightyMounts, so I thought I’d give them a try.  I picked up a MightyMount and a few MightyBolts, hoping I could use them to build some DIY things for these fantastic mounts.

Rubber chair tip removed, PVC cap screwed into place, MightyBolt threaded in.

Rubber chair tip removed, PVC cap screwed into place, MightyBolt threaded in.

On a whim yesterday, I removed the rubber chair tip cap from the monopod and tried to slide on a 3/4″ PVC cap that I had laying on my desk.  It was a perfect fit!  Very snug, maybe even more snug than when slid onto 3/4″ PVC pipe.  So, I drilled and tapped the cap for 1/4-20 threads and screwed one of the MightyBolts into it.  The result is an extendable boom pole that mounts into GearTrac, MightyMounts, and most other track mount systems on kayaks.  To ensure that the cap doesn’t slip, I chose to screw the cap into the monopod rather than glue it to make it easier to remove later should I decide to.

I hope to test this soon. I haven’t even mounted my MightyMount yet!  But when I do, this will be the first thing I try!

ADDED 3-5-2013:

Yesterday I finally installed my YakAttack MightMount with FullBack.  After figuring out where I wanted the mount to be located and verifying that I could reach the area on the inside of the kayak to get the FullBack in place, I began by drilling a small pilot hole in one corner of the mount.  After drilling it out to the size I needed, I placed a bolt in that hole, then began drilling the other three holes one at a time, placing a bolt in each completed hole.  Everything went together well, though I did have clearance issues for the FullBack based upon the tight location I chose.  I was able to make it work, though.

The pictures below show the MightyMount in place with the hacked monopod camera mount in place.  I think it’s going to rock!

6 thoughts on “DIY monopod hacked for kayak mounting

  1. Pingback: DIY monopod hack – the next level | Geek-Fish

  2. “So, I drilled and tapped the cap for 1/4-20 threads and screwed one of the MightyBolts into it. The result is an extendable boom pole that mounts into GearTrac, MightyMounts, and most other track mount systems on kayaks.” …….. this looks like a great DIY project. I wanted to maybe get a Panfish mount for my gopro, but it doesn’t extend high enough, and this should solve that! In regards to the quote above, does the mighty bolt thread into metal threads or did you just screw the bolt into the plastic on the monopod? I’m wondering about long term if the bolt threads will wear out the tapped hole. Doesn’t the bolt need to thread in and out to tighten and loosen the connection to the mighty mount? Thanks for the help, looking forward to this project!

    • The mighty bolt threads into the threads cut by the tap through the PVC cap. Your concern about it wearing out is valid! I have done 1 thing to help with this: I replaced the Schedule 40 PVC cap with a Schedule 80 cap, thus giving me thicker plastic to cut more threads. Additionally, should this wear out, it’s easily replaceable and inexpensive.

      Also, check out this post: http://geek-fish.com/2013/06/20/diy-monopod-hack-the-next-level/

      I’m actually using two Screwballs and a RAM double socket short arm to give this mount even more flexibility and threading of the PVC cap is no longer a concern.

      Keep us posted on your progress!

  3. I’m trying to avoid the RAM balls. They are versatile, yes. But there is a little “play” in the connection, and I prefer the camera to be locked in to the boat a little more snug. Do you find the screwball adds a little camera wobble?

    Here’s an idea on the PVC cap… you could cement a nut into the inside of the PVC cap such that it cannot turn. If the cement bond is tight enough, it might work to sinch down the bolt. Hmm.

    • They seem pretty stable to me.

      I’ve contemplated gluing a nut in place, but I was concerned with getting the nut in the proper place and the adhesive “bleeding” into the hole. I suppose I could just re-tap the hole after the adhesive dries to clear out the hole…

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